Spring Has Landed and Chicks are Here!

Spring has landed and it’s hard to miss around here. Despite the weather roller coaster that we’ve been on in Virginia, we are finally back to “normal” spring weather with beautiful sunny days, chilly nights, and colorful blooms taking shape.

There are still a few daffodils ready to open but many of them blossomed early under warm temperatures, only to be swept away during the past two storms and hard freezes.

Blue Grape Hyacinth Blue Grape Hyacinth cover the roots of the ash tree

Thankfully, the grass is starting to fill in all of the patches created from ongoing construction last year, and the peonies are just starting to poke their heads out of the ground. It’s definitely one of my favorite times of year.

Heirloom PeoniesThe Peonies beginning to rise above ground through the periwinkle

The Hatchery

About five weeks ago, we put over two dozen eggs into the incubator, thanks to my friend Dave. Las year, I traded him four guineas pullets for four of his buff Orpington chicks. Unfortunately, we ended up losing all but one to a fox. The late winter weeks were particularly hard as predators, primarily fox and coyote, roamed the area looking for any available food. Our flock seemed to be their all-you-can-eat buffet! Dave was kind enough to save two dozen fertilized eggs for me to try again this season. With better predator guards in place, I’m hopeful for this round.

Eggs in the Incubator

The egg colors were stunning and I couldn’t wait to see what would pop out. There were sure to be a few Orpingtons, some Sex-links of black Australorp, Copper Maran, and Easter Egger. My primary goal this season is to have some hearty layers to keep my kitchen well-stocked all year. Having only bought one dozen store-bought eggs last year, I got spoiled with a steady supply of the very best, richest farm eggs.

New-born Chicks

After just 21 days, we saw our first pip. It didn’t take long before a few had sprung free, running around the incubator like little dinosaurs, bumping into other eggs and each other. We ended up with twelve chicks of different colors and varieties, two requiring a bit of assistance to break out of their shell walls. It’s a very difficult thing knowing when to assist their hatch and when to let Mother Nature know best. There’s no doubt that had we not assisted in the last two cases, they certainly wouldn’t have made it.

Mother Goose

The chickens aren’t the only ones with eggs this year! After much observation and deliberating, we have finally decided that our two geese are indeed a happy couple. Mother Goose now has about 10 eggs in her clutch and we hope they are viable for hatching, assuming she gets broody along the way.

Mother Goose

They are definitely impressive, rich-tasting eggs, each equalling about a half-cup of liquid. I equate their texture and taste more to a chicken egg. One of our favorite recent recipes was from our friend Lolli who placed an over-easy goose egg on top of a bed of corned beef and potato hash. Can you say perfect? Although I have loved baking and cooking with them, I plan to see how she will treat her current clutch considering they are only good layers for a few months out of the year.

As the season progresses, I have a lot of work to do in my garden (I’m really behind this season).  When I’m not working to pay the bills, other moments have been dedicated to sitting by the fire, eating oysters, and enjoying good company. I hope you are able to enjoy the same this spring.

Springtime Fire

One thought on “Spring Has Landed and Chicks are Here!

  1. Jennifer

    I’m raising chickens the first time this year so if you have any helpful pointers then please send them my way! 🙂

    Reply

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