Monthly Archives: August 2016

Summer’s Bounty

I can’t remember a summer where I’ve enjoyed the fruits and vegetables of the season more than this one. Although it was a busy summer with work and more house projects, there was always a chance to spend time in the garden, to stock up on local produce at the King George Farmers Market, and to get creative in the kitchen with fun ingredients. For the most part, baring a few calamities and skinned knees along the way, summer has been a very joyous occasion.

Blackberry Invasion

One of my favorite Saturday mornings was spent picking blackberries, trying to avoid the impending one-hundred-degree heat index that has pervaded the last month. With winding paths mowed through the tall grass, long sleeves, canvas pants, and enough DEET to take down a small elephant, I ventured out to return with more berries than I consumed. That’s a very tough order.

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I returned with just enough to get started on my favorite blackberry cobbler, which would be the primary course at lunch that day (don’t judge), with another made later in the week. (The second one would definitely be topped with vanilla ice cream). The recipe is a perfect balance of sweet, tender biscuit, and fruit juice that has simmered into a syrup.

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Over the next few weeks, we picked pound upon pound of blackberries that we froze or made into jam. Blackberry jam is one of my necessities for year-round survival, and sometimes I simply eat it with a spoon, it is so good! A few years ago, my friend Nicole told me that cooking jam in copper was the only way to fly. So last spring, I bought my first copper jam pan and gave it a try. I don’t know if it’s the increased evaporation, the contact with the metal, or just the sheer beauty of cooking in copper that makes the jam so much more delicious. Regardless, I’m hooked and will only go back to stainless for jam when it’s a necessity.IMG_0026

Five pounds of wild blackberries simmering in the copper jam pan. The fruit seems to glow!

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The first batch of blackberry jam for the summer

The Garden

In the garden, some of my favorite varieties have really taken off this year. I’m hoping it’s the hard work I put into amending the soil and preparing the beds, but somehow I think it’s just good luck. You might remember my love for white acre peas, which I planted extra of this year. Other favorites that made an appearance include bowling red okra, straight eight cucumbers, early yellow squash, and pineapple cossack ground cherries. What are you growing in your garden?

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The ground cherries look like small paper lanterns on the bottom of the basket

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The white acre peas have been prolific this year, much to my liking

With another few weeks of summer left, the final tomatoes are just now ripening and fall planting will be underway. Here’s to the dog days of summer as we all look to cooler breezes and another joyous season just around the corner.

Ode to a Pine

Thankfully the renovation storms inside have died down, but the summer storms outside have raged many nights. It seems that three or four blow through each week, marked as blobs of orange and red on the radar screen. When you have a large number of eighty-year-old trees scattered around your house, and little resource to keep them as well maintained as they should be, a brightly colored radar blob can be an easy source of anxiety.

With last week’s storm, our fear came true, and we lost part of the old Eastern White Pine. It was inevitable, and we had even planned to remove it in the next couple of months. Unfortunately, Mother Nature had a different timeline.

Eastern White PineWith the wind howling and the rain pounding against the study windows, I could still hear the characteristic woosh that only a forty-or-fifty-foot-plus great White Pine could make as it fell. And then there was the expected, and yet very shocking, crack and thud.

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With a flashlight in the rain, and a deep fear that it had hit the corner of the house, I could see just enough to know that the tree had thankfully missed the building. Unfortunately, it landed on the side of the old Siberian Elm, taking a large branch with it.

Eastern White Pine

Over the past few days, we’ve managed to cut up the smaller pieces, moving them out of the way to prepare the bigger logs for firewood. It’s not hard to see why the Eastern White Pines were so prized in colonial days. This single felled leader is beautiful and strong wood. Known as “mast trees,” and used extensively in ship building, Eastern White Pines were the source of many attempts at control during, and leading up to, the Revolutionary War.

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It remains to be seen how long we can wait before removing the other two leaders. One is even taller than this one, and neither are in structurally sound condition. Once this pine is gone, there is only one other on the property. It’s perhaps time to think about planting a couple more for future generations.

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Many years of wisdom

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The old pine in the snow